Great New Browser, Big Expectations. Be BRAVE & Get BRAVE

“We have a mission to save the web by increasing browsing speed and safety for users, while growing ad revenue share for content creators.”

Everyone is taking notice to a new browser, and for good reason.  The CEO of BRAVE Browser from Brave Software is Brendan Eich.  If you do not know who Brendan Eich is  – Don’t admit to it LOL.  He is an American technologist and creator of the JavaScript programming language. He co-founded the Mozilla project, the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation, and served as the Mozilla Corporation’s chief technical officer and briefly its chief executive officer  (Credit Wikipedia).

I have been using it for a few weeks and am ready to replace everything else for my personal use.  I recommend you try it.

Exchange & Office 365 – Class Computing Back-Up Options

We already know “Microsoft has its own impressively resilient processes for backing up Office 365 services.” MS employs the 3-2-1 backup rule; three copies of the data on two different media with one copy off-site. Microsoft does more than the minimum to cover itself.

From what I have read:  Exchange Online Data is stored at data centers in Quicy, WA; Chicago, IL; San Antonio, TX; and Des Moines, IA.  Microsoft allegedly stores data in at least two of the data centers for availability at all times.  This is in addition to whatever processes they do not tell you publicly.

Now move the responsibility to yourself: The data is in the cloud, but what is YOUR second backup option?  Relying soley on Microsoft to keep a copy of your data is only one media. And the files stored locally on your Outlook client are incomplete, because you have deleted email / files over time.

CLASS COMPUTING HAS EXCELLENT SOLUTIONS.

The Deleted Items Folder can have a retainage policy of: 14 Days, 30 Days, 60 Days, etc; this comes with limited functionality.  Third-party solutions are more robust and easier to use.  Class Computing has a complete back-up offering.

FULLY RUGGED – GETAC V110

THE BEST CONVERTIBLE GETAC® HAS EVER MADE!

The Getac V110 fully rugged convertible notebook is Faster,
More Secure, Thinner and As Versetile As Ever.  It features :

 

Getac V110

6th Gen Intel® Core i7  +  Intel HD Graphics 520

A large 11.6” widescreen display and a design that is as                                               thin and light as ever – at 4.36 lbs. light and 1.26” thin.

Absolute DDS.

This optional protective measure disables your V110 if it detects an unauthorized or compromised entry.

Trusted Platform Module 2.0

The V110 features TPM 2.0 – a powerful anti-tampering device that checks for any signs of intrusion during system boot-up.

NFC/RFID Reader.

Authenticate your credentials via Near Field or  Radio Frequency transmission.

Smart Card Reader.

The V110 supports Smart Cards for secure identity verification.

Fingerprint Scanner

Verify your ID with ease and accuracy by simply swiping your finger.

Windows 10 Multi-Factor Authentication.

The V110’s hardware fully supports Microsoft’s latest authentication tools, including Windows Hello, Microsoft Passport and Credential Guard.

 

V110 Brochure

GET A QUOTE (312) 262-3930 or SALES@classcomputing.com

CLASS APPROVED – GETAC S410

Setting the Standard in Semi-Rugged Computing

Raising the bar on the semi-rugged notebook class, the new S410 is
more rugged, slimmer and lighter than ever before. The all-new S410
boasts the latest computing innovations, including a significant CPU
performance boost, enhanced graphics , and multiple options for
greater flexibility. The S410 puts greater power and adaptability into
the hands of mobile professionals across a range of industries.

Less Downtime When It’s Crunch Time.

It doesn’t happen often, but if a S410 ever needs to be serviced, Getac offers unmatched coverage that will ensure you get your computer fixed and back on the job fast.

Industry’s Best 3-Year Warranty.

Nothing says quality like a manufacturer standing behind their product. We’ve designed the S410 semi-rugged notebook from the inside out to survive drops, shocks, spills, vibration and more. We’re confident in our quality and that’s why the rugged S410 comes standard with the industry’s best 3 years Pack & Collect warranty. It’s the peace-of-mind protection of knowing you’re covered1.

Standard.
3 years Pack & Collect.

S410 Brochure

GET A QUOTE (312) 262-3930 or SALES@classcomputing.com

CARVIR™ CYBER SECURITY NOW AVAILABLE THRU CLASS COMPUTING

Originally from https://www.neverpaytheransom.com/ ©2017CARVIR INFOSEC®

CLASS COMPUTING (www.classcomputing.com) is thrilled to be able to offer this elite Security Service for your companies IT Infrastructure.

The CARVIR™ security team provides the first line of defense – without the noise of managing threat intelligence, research, analysis and false positives. CARVIR will:

  • Kill malicious processes
  • Quarantine malware and infected files
  • Disconnect infected endpoints from the network to prevent lateral spread
  • Alert IT Security personnel via email and SMS
  • Immunize all other protected endpoints on the network against new, never-before-seen threats
  • Report and escalate

Heaps of deep forensic data are transformed into an intuitive visualization in real time. The attack storyline depicts the threat execution flow in high resolution, from inception. Our team can view a specific process on the attack story line and drill down into the individual network, file, process, or data actions that occurred. This information allows our team to take decisive action towards securing your network.

If escalation is needed, we will provide an outline of the attack details. This will often include attack statistics, file information, path, machine name, IP, domain, along with information about where else on the network the attack has been seen, what we’ve done to isolate or eliminate the threat and what your team’s next step should be, if any.

In addition, we can provide cloud reputation, certificate information (if the file is signed or not), and advanced attack details (such as a list of known packers that may have been used). And lastly, we will provide a .csv or .json file of the attack providing forensic level reporting on the threat for your incident response team reporting – especially helpful in compliance driven environments.

Detection

Leverage powerful, behavior-based threat detection to protect data from the types of advanced malware, exploits, drive-bys and script-based attacks that evade outdated, signature based anti-virus technology and sandboxing solutions in Windows, Apple and Linux environments.

Our team actively detects and prevents attacks, even those using memory, PowerShell scripts, insider attacks and browser based drive-by exploits. Once detected, we automatically shut down the attack on the infected machine and prevent lateral movement across the network.

Prevention

Prevention starts with silent monitoring of all user- and kernel-space activity on the endpoint. Our security agent rapidly builds a complete context of normal system activity, which serves as the backdrop for the industry’s most advanced behavior-based threat detection.

With full visibility into the endpoint, the engine pinpoints malicious activity—even by the most sophisticated, stealthy attacks.

We secure Windows, OS X, and Linux endpoint devices (servers, workstations and laptops) for full endpoint protection.

Rollback Ransomware

Eliminate threats the instant they are detected with fully integrated response capabilities. If something slips through, we can reverse any attack-driven file damage and restore* files back to their previous trusted states with the click of a button.

Well, technically our team says it’s two clicks. But who’s counting?

And it’s not just ransomware. We protect data from the types of advanced malware, exploits, drive-bys and script-based attacks that evade outdated, signature based anti-virus technology and sandboxing solutions.

* Requires use of Windows Shadow Copy

Contact CLASS COMPUTING for a QUOTE today!

sales@classcomputing.com

(312) 262-3930

Living Social hack exposes dangers of using one password at multiple sites

Are you guilty of one of the worst bad technology habits possible? Do you ever use the exact same password and login name for a large number of online sites? If so, you might be putting yourself at severe risk. Clever hackers just might crack your password. And when they do, what’s to stop them from using that password to access all of your favorite online sites – including, potentially, your online bank – while pretending to be you?

Major Breach

According to the story, LivingSocial.com — which offers users daily bargains on everything from restaurants and spas to amusement parks and museums — recently suffered a massive security breach. The breach exposed the names, e-mail addresses and password information for up to 50 million LivingSocial users, according to ars technica.

Too Little, Too Late?

After the breach, Tim O’Shaughnessy, chief executive officer of LivingSocial.com, advised the site’s users change the passwords they utilize to access the deals site. He also advised that users change any passwords that they use to access other sites that are the same or similar to what they use to log into LivingSocial. This, as ars technica reports, is a bit of an understatement. If you use the same password to log onto Netflix, LivingSocial.com and your online bank, stop reading this account and immediately go and change these passwords. And do yourself a favor — do not ever reuse a password from one site at another.

Change it Up

It can be difficult to recall dozens of passwords. And there are occasions when you simply want to log onto a site with a password that you’ve used lots of times before as it’s easier than creating, and writing down, a brand-new access code. Don’t fall victim to this urge. If a hacker cracks your password at one site, it’s not overly hard for this cyber criminal to use the same one to gain access to your other Web sites, too, if you’re too lazy to create unique passwords at different sites. Yes, passwords are imperfect. Even so the more creative you are with them — including creating separate passwords for each and every site you visit — the better off you’ll be.

Can you guess which mobile device is hacked most often?

Apple’s iPhone collection of smartphones remains loved by consumers. Unfortunately, they’re also well-liked by a less savory group, hackers. Business Insider recently documented on a new study that found that the iPhone stands as the most hacked mobile device. And most stunning? It’s not even close – the iPhone is the most hacked by a lot.

The most hacked

Business Insider reported on the latest figures from Web security company SourceFire, which released the report “25 Years of Vulnerabilities.” This report charted the Critical Vulnerabilities and Exposures — better known as CVE — of a host of software and mobile devices. The CVE is the standard that security companies use when charting cyber-exploits. SourceFire found that 210 CVE reports had been filed on the iPhone. For comparison’s sake, Android only had 24 CVE reports.

What’s behind it?

This begs the question: Why have iPhones been hacked so many more times than have Android mobile devices? Just as with so many other big questions, there aren’t any easy answers. Business Insider ponders whether part of the reason could be the iPhone’s popularity. The devices, after all, remain a top seller. But the SourceFire report states that Android has received fewer CVEs in 2012 than it did in 2011. This drop happened even though Android enjoyed a big rise in market share last year.

Going after the king

A recent interview with the SourceFire report author on the ZDNet Web site proposes another excuse for the high number of iPhone hacks: Hacking the iPhone might present a challenge worthy of the most talented hackers. Consider how Android devices work. They make use of an open platform. Consequently developers could create malicious third-party apps that users can download onto their phones. That’s not very much of a challenge for hackers. But hacking the iPhone, which does not boast an open platform? That’s a true test of a hacker’s skill.

Don’t leave your small business vulnerable to a cyber attack

Hackers aren’t shy about targeting small businesses. They know that the majority of businesses are vulnerable to cyber crimes. It’s not overly difficult for smart hackers to break into the credit-card accounts or bank accounts of small businesses. Many have no difficulty accessing employee facts such as their Social Security numbers. Fortunately, small business owners do have a tool to use against cyber criminals: common sense. Entrepreneur Magazine recently ran a feature story providing tips for small business owners who want to protect their businesses from hackers. Below are a few suggestions from the story.

Encrypt your Data

Entrepreneur recommends that you first encrypt all of your significant data, anything from bank routing numbers to credit-card account information to employee Social Security numbers. Hackers want to steal these records. It’s how they ultimately drain money from your small business. Entrepreneur’s advice? Turn on the full-disk encryption tools that are included with your computer’s operating systems. On Windows, this tool is labeled BitLocker. On Macintosh computers, it’s known as FileVault. The tool, once activated, will encrypt every file and program on the drive.

The Lockdown Approach

Most computers have a Kensington lock port, a small metal loop that users can run a cable through to lock them to their desks. If you wish to truly protect your business, require that your employees take this protection measure. It might sound silly, but the Entrepreneur story said that businesses are often hacked after burglars break in and steal laptops along with other devices. A cable strapping a laptop to a desk won’t stop all thieves. But it might scare away those who want to strike especially quickly.

Wi-Fi Protection

Often the easiest way for cyber criminals to gain access to your company accounts is through your business’ Wi-Fi network. That’s why Entrepreneur Magazine suggests you do away with Wi-Fi completely and instead install a wired network. If you can’t do that, at least protect your Wi-Fi accounts with passwords which are difficult to compromise. A good bet? Long passwords consisting of a combination of letters, numbers and symbols.

These IT projects will boost your business in 2013

If your business isn’t growing, it’s dying. That’s why it’s important to stay on the lookout for new ways to grow your small business. There is one area, though, where small business owners often fail to look for growth strategies: IT. Yes, you can grow your business’ revenue by investing in IT. Small Business Computing.com provides a roadmap, listing several IT projects to help make your business and employees more efficient and productive.

Bring Wi-Fi to your business

A growing number of businesses permit their staff to bring their own electronic devices – everything from laptops to tablets – to their cubicles. The reasoning driving this movement: When people work on laptops and tablets that they know well, they work more proficiently. But allowing your employees to participate in the bring-your-own-device movement doesn’t mean much if your office isn’t prepared with a reliable Wi-Fi network that allows your workers to access the internet, send e-mail and post to social media sites while at their desks. Make installing a powerful Wi-Fi network in your office a top priority for 2013.

Ultrabooks

Ultrabooks are outstanding tools. They’re not as cumbersome as traditional laptops and far more powerful than Netbooks. They can also help your salesforce bring in more business: They can take their Ultrabooks home with them or on the road when they’re traveling to work on reports and presentations. They can run multimedia presentations for potential customers. And Ultrabooks are more affordable than ever today. If you want your employees to reach their full potential, equip them with Ultrabooks.

No more Windows XP

Do you still have computers running the Windows XP operating system? That’s a mistake. As Small Business Computing.com highlights, Microsoft will not provide technical support for this operating system as of early April 2014. The company will also no longer distribute regular security updates for the system as of this time. Running Windows XP, then, means that not only will your employees be working on a decade-old operating system, but their computers will also be highly susceptible to virus attacks. Make the smart move and upgrade to a more current Windows operating system.

Is the U.S. government driving a black market in zero-day bugs?

Stuxnet made big headlines in 2010. That’s when online security experts first discovered this new piece of malware, one strong enough to attack and control the industrial systems used in the nuclear program being developed by Iran. As a newly released story by the MIT Technology Review says, most people today believe the intelligence departments of Israel and the United States collaborated to develop Stuxnet. And that, to many, is troubling news. It’s evidence of a new from of electronic warfare, one in which countries create powerful malevolent software to unleash on their adversaries. And the United States seems to be leading the charge.

A developing industry

What is the long-term impact of malware weapons? The Technology Review story fears that governments, by investing a great deal of research and dollars into creating these virtual weapons, is making an ever-more hazardous Internet. And it appears these fears are justified. Since Stuxnet was unleashed in 2010, it’s clear that governments have invested a lot more money producing malware weapons. No one knows, in fact, how frequently such weapons have been deployed. It’s almost certain many of these weapons have already been unleashed without the public’s knowledge.

A mobile attack?

Even more alarming? Smartphones and tablets are far from safe from this kind of government-created malware. It’s indisputable that consumers are leaving desktop computers and latching onto smartphones, tablets as well as other mobile-computing devices. As this trend gains momentum, governments are focusing their efforts on the mobile market. The Technology Review story says that exploits that focus on mobile software are prized because manufacturers so rarely send updates to their mobile operating systems. As a result these systems are especially susceptible to malware attacks.

An old story?

The Technology Review story ends on this chilling thought: Maybe malware weapons are nothing new. After all, countries are always developing new and more damaging weapons. It ought to come as little surprise, then, that governments are taking to the online world, too, with regards to crafting new weapons. It’s unfortunate, though, that this newest round of arms building is creating a more dangerous Internet.